Aventura Holistic Health Blog

A health blog dedicated to staying healthy, eating well and living up to your potential.

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  • figbars

    Got a craving for something sweet? Enjoy these delicious and nutritious fig bars!

     

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup chopped figs, dried
    • ½ cup pureed chestnuts
    • 1 cup grain coffee or soy milk
    • Juice and rind of 1 orange
    • 2 tablespoons rice flour
    • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    • Light pressed pie crust

    Cooking Instructions

    • Preheat oven to 350F
    • Simmer all ingredients together 5 minutes until thick
    • Spoon into pie crust and sprinkle with extra dough
    • Bake 30-40 minutes
    • Cool and cut into bars.
    • Yields 24 bars

    References: Pitchford, Paul (2002). Healing With Whole Foods. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books.

  • roasted beets

    Why You Should Eat More Beets!
     

    Beets can’t be beat! Beets are packed with so many good-for-you vitamins and micro-nutrients that you should seriously consider adding them into your diet.   Traditional wisdom states the sweet flavor of the beet strengthens the heart, sedates the spirit, improves circulation, purifies the blood, liver, moistens the intestines and promotes menstruation.  Beets are notorious for their detoxifying components and should be added to any individual’s diet who may suffer from “deficient blood” disorders.
     

    Caution:  The greens contain abundant oxalic acid, and if eaten excessively, inhibit calcium metabolism.

    Baked/Roasted Beet Recipe:
     

    This is a convenient way to prepare beets when the stove-top is crowded.


    Ingredients:
     

    • 1 pound of beets, stems trimmed to 1 inch
    • ½ cup of water
    • 2 tablespoons olive, or walnut oil
    • 1 tablespoon minced parsley, chives, or dill
    • Fresh lemon or lime juice to taste

    What to do:
     

    • Preheat the oven to 350°F
    • Place the beets in an 8-inch square baking pan or a round oven-proof dish
    • Add water. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake until the beets are easily pierced with a thin skewer or knife tip, about 45 minutes for small beets, 1 hour for medium, and 1¼ hours for large beets
    • Slip off the skins, and leave the beets whole or slice into round or wedges. Season with salt and black pepper, or paprika to taste. Toss with butter or oil, minced parsley, and lemon juice
       
      References: Pitchford, Paul (2002). Healing With Whole Foods. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books. 
  • Hot And Sour Chinese Salad

    Hot And sour Chinese Salad

    This flavorful salad combines peas, noodles, umeboshi and fresh onion for a very satisfying "hot and sour" taste.

    • 2  cups snow peas or early peas, cooked slightly
    • 4 cups noodles, cooked and drained and cut into 2-inch lengths

    Dressing:

    • 1 green onion, chopped
    • 1 tablespoon umeboshi paste
    • 2-3 teaspons mustard
    • Juice of 1-2 lemons
    • Gently combine peas with noodles
    • Blend ingredients for dressing with a mortar and pestle or blender
    • Add dressing to noodle mixture
    • Mix lightly and serve before noodles become mushy.

    Healing properties:


    Cooling thermal nature.

  • Pate

    Babaganouj (Mediterranean Eggplant Pate)
     

    If you’ve never had Babaganouj you are in for a treat.  This tasty spread is easy to prepare and quite healthy.
     

    • 2 eggplants
    • Juice of 1 lemon
    • ¼ cup sesame butter
    • ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped
    • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    • 1 teaspoon olive oil (optional)
    • Preheat oven to 400
    • Prick eggplants with a fork.
    • Roast until slightly charred and popped (45 minutes). Cool.
    • Scoop the insides out and mash well or puree
    • Combine with all ingredients except olive oil.
    • Drizzle oil over top before serving.
    • Serve with vegetables or pita bread.


  • Lentils With Curry

    Lentil Curry
     

    Delicious concoction of lentils with curry and spices that is sure to please the palate.
     

    • 1 cup lentils, soaked
    • 4 cups water
    • 1 tablespoon curry powder or 1/4 teaspoon each; coriander, cayenne, ginger, cinnamon, and turmeric
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • Cook lentils until soft.
    • Add salt and seasonings
    • Cover and cook 5-10 minutes.
    • Serve over rice.
    • Serves 4.


    Healing Properties:

    Lentils typically have a neutral thermal nature, mild flavor, diuretic, beneficial to the heart and circulation; stimulates the adrenal system; and increases the "vitality" of the kidneys. Turmeric(the chief ingredient in curry) is warming and bitter and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It is important to note that in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis, dietary turmeric improved flexibility and reduced joint swelling.

  • Show all entries from Recipes

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Recent posts from this category

Recent posts from this category

  • The Role Of Balance

    The Role Of Balance


    Balance is one of the primary- almost axiomatic- concepts of the Taoist philosophy as the philosophy of the Tao has a basic respect for the natural balance inherit in all things. In the realm of nature, for example, you wouldn’t volitionally opt to upset this balance; rather, you would try to adapt yourself to its flow. In other words, you should always try to go along with it and avoid, say, the kind of mistake made in the 1950’s by the World Health Organization (WHO). In its attempt to eliminate malaria in northern Borneo, WHO employed the pesticide dieldrin on the local mosquito population, which was known to carry the disease. At first, the people at WHO believed they had solved the problem, since the use of the chemical had significantly diminished the abundance of mosquitos (and even flies and cockroaches) and, along with them, the incidence of malaria. But then a strange thing happened: the roofs of the villages’ huts began to collapse on top of them and a typhoid epidemic broke out.
     

    The reason was that local lizards began eating the insects that were laden with the dieldrin. The lizards, full of the toxic chemical, were eaten by the cats of the village, and that effectively wiped out the cat population. With the cats gone, the local rat population skyrocketed, and they ran unchecked throughout the villages, carrying with them typhus-infested fleas. The roofs then began collapsing because the dieldrin, in addition to killing the mosquitos, cockroaches, and flies, also killed the wasps that ordinarily would have consumed the caterpillars that, left unchecked, were not eating the villagers’ thatched roofs. Through such an interference with the balance of nature, the WHO, for a time, found itself in some difficulty.
     

    The philosophy of balance, or rather the respect for balance, is perhaps best illustrated by squeezing a rubber ball. However or wherever you squeeze it, the ball will yield, but it never loses its balance. It’s the safest form in the world, completely contained and never off center. To be completely contained, never susceptible to being put off center or phased by anything, is what is aimed at in the philosophy…
     

    Similarly, those of us who wish to cultivate a stress-free existence have to be possessed of this same sense of balance, never being put off center no matter how hard we seem to get squeezed. We have to learn how to flow with life in the same way that the ball responds to the movements of the water, that the leaf travels with the wind, and that the martial artist cultivates a state of harmony between himself and his opponent. When we can accomplish this, we need never again be snared by conflict- of any kind.
     

    Excerpt From: Little, John (1996). The Warrior Within: the philosophies of Bruce Lee. United States: Mcgraw-Hill

    Tagged in: Lifestyle
  • Fasting

    All About Fasting
     

    Fasting and purification can be an uplifting experience that enhances health and one’s own attitude of the body, depending on how and why it is done.
     

    It is recommended that most modern westernized people need to fast from a lifelong daily schedule of three meals a day.
     

    For generations our primitive ancestors have fasted.  In the springtime when winter supplies ran low, they typically fasted for several weeks on little more than water and vegetables.
     

    Why fast?
     

    • Fasting is an important self-discipline technique to overcome emotional attachments to food.
    • Fasting can help purify the body before a major change in diet to better one’s health.
    • To help break up physical and mental stagnancy which manifests as poor appetite, apathy, fatigue, depression and many chronic ailments.
    • For spiritual reasons: To strengthen ones spiritual practice, prayer or meditation.
       

    What Is Fasting?
     

    Fasting can best be described as speeding-up the cleansing and renewal process by slowing down the normal digestive routine. “Cleansing”, generally means the purging of toxins and residues we have accumulated by using too many foods rich in fat and proteins which build tissue rapidly.

    Certain foods work better for a cleanse than others, depending on the food residues that need to be eliminated.  These residues are highly acidic and are most often from high-fat mucus-forming categories. Examples are: Meats, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy, grains and legumes, refined sugars, chemicals and drugs. When the body is too acidic from certain food accumulations it is said disease and infections can proliferate more easily.
     

    The Acid-Alkaline Balance
     

    Your body has a natural acid/alkaline balance. Medications, sugars, stress, lack of exercise and poor dietary habits can all make the body more acidic.  There are several foods that can be instilled into your diet that can help tip this balance back.  The most alkaline-producing foods are fruits, vegetables, sprouts, cereal grasses, and herbs.  The exact proper ratio of acidic and alkalizing foods is difficult to determine, since the balance is altered simply by chewing, food preparation practices, exercise and lifestyle, and even our level of positive thinking.
     

    Whole-Grain Fast
     

    The person who wants to improve mental focus and whose constitution ranges from fairly balanced to slightly deficient and thin, or cold, will normally benefit from a whole-grain fast for at least three days.  Chew each bite thirty to fifty times. Rice and other whole grains may be used. Millet is recommended for it’s alkaline, detoxifying nature.  Wheat and other grain sprouts are also alkaline, and less cooling when steamed. Warming herb teas such as cinnamon bark and dried ginger root can be used by those with cold signs.
     

    Steamed-Vegetable Fast
     

    If you have overeaten consistently, consuming excess sweets, nuts, beans, grains, dairy, or eggs, and your condition is a little on the cool and deficient side, then consider a fast of lightly steamed vegetables of your choice.  Take at most three different vegetables at a time, although one or two is preferable.  Drink water or herbal teas according to thirst.
     

    When Not To Fast
     

    • During serious physical or mental degenerations, unless advised by a knowledgeable doctor or healthcare practitioner.
    • In cold weather
    • If one is malnourished, starving or deprived of proper nutrition
    • During pregnancy or lactation.
       

    Fasting has been used to rid the body of virtually every disorder involving excess as well as to increase vitality. When the fast is over, it is important to not overeat.  The success of the fast depends on the after parts- for the desire to binge can be monumental.  If one immediately puts all the excesses back into routine, any benefit from the fast is doubtful.  It may benefit one to seek the experience and care of a health-care practitioner prior to attempting a fast.
     

    References: Pitchford, Paul (2002). Healing With Whole Foods. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books.

  • alt

    Announcing a solution to get you to QUIT SMOKING with proven results:
     

    Acupuncture treatments have been shown to cause reductions in cravings, anxiety, and sleep disturbances associated with nicotine withdrawal.
     

    It’s a New Year and you can discover the many health benefits associated with quitting smoking.

  • Yoga Breathing

    Pranayama Breathing Exercises
     

    Much of the general public pays no attention to their breathing habits and for good reason, it's done automatically for us.  However, Yogi's have known it for years and scientists are just starting to uncover some the benefits of controlled breathing exercises. There are many different styles, techniques, and forms of breathing exercises that exist but this article is going to focus on the technique of "Yoga Breathing", or Pranayama.


  • Weight Loss Help With Acupuncture TreatmentsWeight Loss Help With Acupuncture Treatments


    When we commence a new exercise or diet plan, it’s often stressful to get enough energy to see it through. Acupuncture will you be able to assist with weight loss by increasing your energy levels, therefore making it a lot simpler to exercise.Acupuncture also helps to further improve metabolism and boost circulation. The application of acupuncture needles aids to mobilize the body’s energy reserves, which leads to...

  • Show all entries from Wellness Tips
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